Chapel Street Players http://chapelstreetplayers.org /// Your Ticket to Great Theater Fri, 26 May 2017 15:54:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6.6 72764603 UseMeForHeadline http://chapelstreetplayers.org/845/ http://chapelstreetplayers.org/845/#respond Fri, 06 Mar 2015 15:09:05 +0000 http://chapelstreetplayers.org/?p=845 83rd season (2017-2018) production schedule :: Subscribe Online

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83rd season (2017-2018) production schedule :: Subscribe Online

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(A. Renaldi) Holy Traffic: Rough Road Ahead http://chapelstreetplayers.org/renaldi_holy_traffic/ http://chapelstreetplayers.org/renaldi_holy_traffic/#respond Wed, 05 Apr 2017 23:25:21 +0000 http://chapelstreetplayers.org/?p=2096 submitted by Anthony Renaldi

Holy Traffic, the original play by Paul Maltby, follows the exploits of the Dallariva brothers, Tony, who has just recommitted himself to his Catholic faith (and is about to have that faith tested), and his scheming brother,

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submitted by Anthony Renaldi

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(L to R ) Bill Potter. Jeremiah Dillard photo by Peter Kuo

Holy Traffic, the original play by Paul Maltby, follows the exploits of the Dallariva brothers, Tony, who has just recommitted himself to his Catholic faith (and is about to have that faith tested), and his scheming brother, Joey, who has hatched an unholy plan to steal the Popemobile during the pontiff’s visit to Atlantic City and who needs Tony’s help to pull it off. The Dallarivas take the audience (and an unintended passenger) on a wild, night-time ride along the Jersey Shore in this farce as Tony and Joey encounter an assortment of nuts—evangelical snake handlers, New Age pagans, Satanists and Voodooists—during their attempt to deliver the stolen Popemobile to their buyer.

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(L to R) Justine Quirk, Marshal Manlove photo by: Peter Kuo

Traffic, directed by Connie Regan and Vaughan Ellerton, drove onto the Chapel Street Players stage on the final day of March and runs through April 8th. This play has plenty of laughs and a diverse cast. Act One moves along at a nice pace with only minor bumps in the road. The dialogue seems forced at times and left me wondering if Bill Potter (Joey) had forgotten his lines and had to resort to ad-libbing his way through the scenes, but I ultimately decided it was the actor’s (or director’s) chosen delivery style. The squabbling between the brothers is initially funny, but wears thin quickly, becoming less funny as the play goes on. There are bright moments in the play, including a very funny motel exorcism scene. The play satirizes religion, so those easily offended by that type of humor should take that as a disclaimer. Additionally, Joey drops F-bombs like a B-52 over Iraq, so audience members should be prepared for that, particularly if bringing children to the show. Act Two is where the play hits a speed bump and limps to the side of the road, forcing the audience to endure ‘til the end and wishing fervently to push the OnStar button for roadside assistance…or at least an editing pen. The problem is that, at two hours and forty-seven minutes, the play is a bit too long. That’s not to say there aren’t still big laughs to be had (some of the biggest came in the second act), but the playwright should have put a sharper point on his editing pencil and cut repetitive material and material that simply didn’t work. It would be interesting to see this play after a laying on of hands in the form of a critical review/re-write.

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(L to R) Marlene Hummel, Sharon Brown photo by: Peter Kuo

Jeremiah Dillard played Tony with great conviction as his brother’s unwitting accomplice and drew laughs each time he (literally) came under the spotlight to denounce his faith. Brooks Black shined as Millie and Colleen Boyle, Marlene Hummel, and Sharon Brown were hilarious as novice exorcists. As always, CSP does wonders with their small stage. Vaughan Ellerton gets kudos for a smart, functional set design as well as for the cleverly engineered Popemobile, which nearly stole the show.

Here’s where the rubber hits the road. Holy Traffic is not the best production to hit the CSP stage, but it isn’t horrible, so take a pew and take a chance on this original production before it closes. If you don’t like it, you can always pray for deliverance.

Holy Traffic! runs through April 8 (visit http://chapelstreetplayers.org/ for specific show dates/times and other offerings by CSP).

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24 http://chapelstreetplayers.org/24-hour-playwriting-festival-1/ http://chapelstreetplayers.org/24-hour-playwriting-festival-1/#respond Tue, 28 Mar 2017 15:04:42 +0000 http://chapelstreetplayers.org/?p=2071 The post 24 appeared first on Chapel Street Players.

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Write/Rehearse/Perform – A 24-Hour Playwriting Festival http://chapelstreetplayers.org/24-hour-playwriting-festival-1/ http://chapelstreetplayers.org/24-hour-playwriting-festival-1/#respond Mon, 20 Mar 2017 15:16:07 +0000 http://chapelstreetplayers.org/?p=2057 April 29, 8pm / All tickets are $5

Starting at 8pm, Apr 28, Six playwrights will work overnight to create 6 original 10-minute plays. By morning, the plays will be delivered to directors who will then choose their casts and begin rehearsals. At 8pm, ready or not,

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April 29, 8pm / All tickets are $5

Starting at 8pm, Apr 28, Six playwrights will work overnight to create 6 original 10-minute plays. By morning, the plays will be delivered to directors who will then choose their casts and begin rehearsals. At 8pm, ready or not, the shows will go on. Join us for the creative results. It’s sure to be a fun night for everyone!

Audition: Friday, April 28 th at 7:30 pm
Performance: Saturday, April 29 th at 8:00 pm (YES! 24 HOURS LATER!!)

About the Festival

We are compressing the whole process of writing, rehearsing, and performing 6 plays into 24 hours. After the Friday night auditions, the writers will overnight write the six plays of 10-15 minutes length. Directors will start rehearsals Saturday morning full throttle, speeding to the performance 12 hours later! The Good News: Tech week will now be Tech 30 minutes! The Bad News: This crazy feat of creation will be over in about 24 hours (except for the after party, of course)!

Audition Requirements

An adventurous soul with a “We can DO this!” attitude is recommended. Each actor should bring an interesting prop to the audition. As their audition piece, each actor will have up to 2 minutes to “pitch” why the writers should use this oh-so interesting prop in their play. If the actor doesn’t bring a prop, we got your back! We’ll have a selection of less-interesting props to choose from (so bring yours – no explosives, please). If cast, you will need to be available on Saturday from 8:30 am to the end of the performance that night. All actors must be 18 years or older.

Obligatory Higher Purpose Statement

The main thing we want to accomplish with this festival is to CREATE some new art and HAVE FUN! Your focus on enjoying the compressed creative process while supporting your fellow adventurers with patience and a low-maintenance attitude is expected. Plus how often do you get the chance to bring a character to life for the very first time in a show that was just written?

Please address any questions you may have to Joseph Pukatsch at irsher@mindspring.com or Alan Harbaugh at alan2home@yahoo.com.

See you and your prop on April 28 th at 7:30!

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(A. Renaldi) The Diary of Anne Frank: A Story of Hope and Innocence Lost http://www.officialanthonyrenaldi.com/?p=518 http://www.officialanthonyrenaldi.com/?p=518#respond Tue, 07 Feb 2017 14:29:24 +0000 http://chapelstreetplayers.org/?p=1992 The Diary of a Young Girl has become one of the most important texts of the Holocaust. The author of that diary, Annelies Marie Frank, better known to the world as Anne Frank, became one of the most tragic and certainly one of the most debated Jewish victims of that horrific period in world history.

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The Diary of a Young Girl has become one of the most important texts of the Holocaust. The author of that diary, Annelies Marie Frank, better known to the world as Anne Frank, became one of the most tragic and certainly one of the most debated Jewish victims of that horrific period in world history. Diary is the true story of Anne and her family. Forced to flee Nazi Germany in 1934, the Frank family settled in Amsterdam where Otto Frank established a successful business, but by 1942, the Nazis invaded The Netherlands and the Franks were forced into hiding to escape being dragged off to the Nazi death camps. Those familiar with the story know that the Franks were discovered in an attic and arrested in 1944. That hiding place, the secret annex above Otto Frank’s business, would become their home and their self-imposed prison for two years, and is also the setting for Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett’s 1955 drama, The Diary of Anne Frank. If you’re somehow unfamiliar with this story or have never experienced the story played out on stage, Chapel Street Players is presenting their production of the play in Newark, Delaware now.

Set against a backdrop of the looming danger of Nazi occupied Amsterdam, this Jeff Robleto directed production ably captures the despair, claustrophobia, frustration, and abject fear of discovery for Anne and the other seven occupants of the confined, overcrowded attic apartment while highlighting the minutia of everyday life—homework, family arguments, a school girl’s obsession with movie stars as well as her crush on a boy.

Maria Cardillo delivers a delightful performance portraying Anne, the ever hopeful and exceptionally bright diarist, not as the canonized figure that the real-life Otto Frank wanted the world to see, but rather as a typical adolescent, bursting with all of the youthful anguish conveyed through the pages of Anne’s diary and prone to irritating enthusiasm (for some of her fellow confinees), irrational mood swings, pettiness, and the sexual urges and temptations that are inevitable when hormonal teenagers are involved.

Victor Cardillo, Maria’s real-life father, delivers a credible performance as the compassionate Otto Frank, especially in the scenes he shares with his daughter. Lisa Osicky portrays Edith with convincing, heart wrenching frustration because of the situation in which they’ve found themselves and the increasing hostility directed at her from Anne. Gabrielle Rambo brings quiet dignity to the role of Margot and Lisa Velardi breathes life into the character of Mrs. van Daan, generating laughter in key moments to diffuse the tension. A principle source of that tension is Christopher M. Woerner who, as Mr. van Daan, complains endlessly and argues with everyone, particularly Anne and Peter, the van Daan’s shy and socially awkward son played wonderfully by Preston Kifer. Pete Matthews rounds out the cast of principal actors as Mr. Dussel, an irritant and foil for Anne and Peter.

Chapel Street Players’ set designer, Ray Barto, worked his magic to transform the small stage into the cramped attic with its various rooms.

During their self-confinement in the attic at Prinsengracht 263, the Franks never lost hope that the nightmare would eventually end and that they could return to their lives. Anne’s diary was a testament to that hope and to her indomitable human spirit, the spirit that exists in all of us. Diary beautifully represents that hope. Our world has changed little since the 1940s. There are no longer Nazis occupying the streets, but racism, bigotry, and hatred are all still very much alive today as then, making this play and the words of a young Jewish girl as relevant as ever. Our world is still volatile, but like Anne, we can hope for a better tomorrow for “where there’s hope, there’s life.”

The Diary of Anne Frank runs through February 11th (visit http://chapelstreetplayers.org/ for specific show dates/times and other offerings by CSP).

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(NewsJournal)‘Diary of Anne Frank’ takes audience to 1940s Amsterdam http://‘Diary%20of%20Anne%20Frank’%20takes%20audience%20to%201940s%20Amsterdam http://‘Diary%20of%20Anne%20Frank’%20takes%20audience%20to%201940s%20Amsterdam#respond Mon, 06 Feb 2017 18:56:42 +0000 http://chapelstreetplayers.org/?p=1987 Few diaries are as well-known (or as devastating) as the that belonged to Anne Frank, a Jewish teen who spent two years in hiding with her family during World War II.

Chapel Street Players’ production of “The Diary of Anne Frank,” directed by Jeff Robleto,

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Few diaries are as well-known (or as devastating) as the that belonged to Anne Frank, a Jewish teen who spent two years in hiding with her family during World War II.

Chapel Street Players’ production of “The Diary of Anne Frank,” directed by Jeff Robleto, effectively transports the audience to the Secret Annex in 1940s Amsterdam.

Like the book, “Diary” the play shows the everyday, even mundane, side of a horrifying situation. It’s the “normal” things – the bickering over small things, Anne’s slowly developing crush on a boy, and the moments of laughter – that make it come to life as a story about real people who, aside from living in an attic with limited rations for years, are not that different from any of us.

Pennsville High senior Maria Cardillo shines bright as Anne, who goes into hiding a cheerful and curious girl in pigtails, and is taken away as a young woman who somehow still found things to smile about.

Maria’s father, Vincent Cardillo, plays the role of Anne’s father, a nice detail in a story that is so much about family devotion. Lisa Osicky plays Anne’s mother, a woman holding it together as best she can and butting heads with Anne along the way. Anne’s more somber and less outspoken sister, Margot, is played by Gabrielle Rambo, who brings plenty of presence to an often-quiet role.

One of my favorite performances in this production is Lisa Velardi as Mrs. Van Daan. Not because Van Daan is unusual and exciting, but because Velardi makes her a very real and relatable woman. Van Daan’s son, Peter, played by Preston Kifer, adds another layer to the household dynamic, as the only unrelated youth Anne sees in all that time.

Through it all, the family believes they will be able to go back to their regular lives soon, back to school and work and cooking unrationed meals. Even as they hear that most of their friends have been captured, they – especially Anne – have hope.

The diary is so iconic that it’s not a spoiler to say that almost none of them would survive concentration camps and knowing that makes Anne’s innocence and optimism more powerful.

As director Robleto says in his message, “in an era where the world seems as divisive as ever, we need to remember the words of a little girl who never stopped believing that people were really good at heart.”

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(NewsJournal) Chapel Street’s Alt-Christmas show mocks seasonal shows http://www.delawareonline.com/story/life/2016/12/08/chapel-streets-alt-christmas-show-mocks-seasonal-shows/95171514/ http://www.delawareonline.com/story/life/2016/12/08/chapel-streets-alt-christmas-show-mocks-seasonal-shows/95171514/#respond Sun, 11 Dec 2016 09:59:01 +0000 http://chapelstreetplayers.org/?p=1945 When it comes to Christmas, Chapel Street Players like to do their own thing, maybe the most experimental of their regular season shows.

“Every Christmas Story Ever Told (And Then Some!)” features a trio of community theater actors as comic versions of themselves putting on a show.

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When it comes to Christmas, Chapel Street Players like to do their own thing, maybe the most experimental of their regular season shows.

“Every Christmas Story Ever Told (And Then Some!)” features a trio of community theater actors as comic versions of themselves putting on a show.

Tired of the same old holiday fare, they challenge themselves to perform every Christmas story they can think of in less than two hours.

Brooks Black just wants to do “A Christmas Carol,” as usual, but Colleen Doyle, decked out in a Jacob Marley’s ghost costume, can’t face another year of Scrooge and the gang.

Fellow “ghost” Frank Newton gets on board to ditch the play for a fast-moving montage-slash-mashup of beloved Christmas stories, most of them from the Christmas TV specials of ‘70s and ‘80s childhoods.

From “The Grinch” to a copyright-compliant knockoff of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer to “A Charlie Brown Christmas,” the Cindy Starcher-directed show covers as many classics as possible.

Though the pacing is uneven at times, Doyle and Newton do a good job as comedic foils to Brooks’ Straight Woman, a balance that works well. Doyle, in particular, has hilarious moments as the ultra-enthusiastic and often naive one.

While the first Act is a montage filled with familiar Christmas story references, Act 2 narrows it down (for the most part) to two: “A Christmas Carol” and “It’s a Wonderful Life.” This mashup is the show’s highlight, as the two classics intertwine with ease (or at least they make it look easy).

“Every Christmas Story” doesn’t try to be an “edgy” alternative to typical holiday plays; it isn’t a Christmas show for people who don’t like Christmas shows.

It’s something different without being too different – a fun couple of hours revisiting classic Christmas favorites with three actors in an intimate theater.

Holly Quinn is a Wilmington freelance writer.

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(A. Renaldi) Every Christmas Story Ever Told (And Then Some) http://www.officialanthonyrenaldi.com/?p=468 http://www.officialanthonyrenaldi.com/?p=468#respond Tue, 06 Dec 2016 15:22:11 +0000 http://chapelstreetplayers.org/?p=1929 By Anthony Renaldi

You know Dasher and Dancer and Prancer and Vixen, but do you recall Gustav the Green-Nosed Rain Goat? You don’t? Well, maybe that’s because you haven’t seen Every Christmas Story Ever Told (And Then Some). If you haven’t,

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By Anthony Renaldi

You know Dasher and Dancer and Prancer and Vixen, but do you recall Gustav the Green-Nosed Rain Goat? You don’t? Well, maybe that’s because you haven’t seen Every Christmas Story Ever Told (And Then Some). If you haven’t, you’re in luck. Chapel Street Players in Newark, Delaware is serving up this Michael Carleton, James FitzGerald and John K. Alvarez holiday treat this holiday season.
Three actors are about to present their production of Dickens’ BHC—that’s beloved holiday classic, if you didn’t know—A Christmas Carol. The audience is in their seats, the show has started, “Marley was dead: to begin with…” Only one actor isn’t having it. She (yes, I said she—CSP has delightfully swapped gender roles for this production and assigned two of the roles traditionally played by male actors to female actors). Anyway, Brooks is onstage speaking her lines and Colleen (she’s playing Marley’s ghost) just can’t take another year of doing A Christmas Carol. She played Mrs. Cratchit in last year’s production and she’s over it. Frank, the third actor, enters and also chimes in and together they convince Brooks to present every Christmas story ever told. Brooks’ only condition is that they include A Christmas Carol. The others agree and hilarity ensues.

Spoiler alert! The play does not include every Christmas story ever told, but by jingle it includes A LOT of them. There’s a nod to the Nutcracker and the cast pays homage to “A Charlie Brown Christmas” with a fun version of the Peanuts dance and Linus’ reading of the Gospel of Luke. It’s a fast paced show with jokes fired out at the audience faster than you can say Jack Frost. Some are great some will make you groan if you have time to think about them, but you don’t. As I said, the show is fast paced with lots of laughs (your little round belly will shake like a bowl full of jelly), lots of costume changes and an almost constant presence on stage by the three hard working actors. For parents considering bringing children, there is some delightful (but mildly naughty humor) and a discussion about whether SC really exists. Throughout Act I, the zaniness comes more rapid than eagles with singing, dancing, bawdy jokes, and the dismantling of the fourth wall.

In Act II, Brooks finally gets her way as the cast presents A Christmas Carol…sort of. It’s more like A Wonderful Christmas Carol Life, but very, very funny. The second act is much shorter than the first, but there are still some fun surprises and hearty laughs in store for the audience. I won’t spoil them here.

Brooks Black (Brooks) is a delight as she resolutely tries to stage A Christmas Carol, her idea of what Christmas means to her, and must suffer through the presentation of multiple other BHCs and her cast mates’ mockery before finally getting to do so. In many ways, she plays the “straight man,” but has plenty of comic moments herself. Frank Newton (Frank) is charming and funny with fantastic comic timing as well as hilarious facial expressions and a natural delivery that makes you forget he’s acting. And Colleen Doyle (Colleen) delivers huge laughs as many off-the-wall characters like Frosty, a pirate, and a host of others, but still manages to charm the audience with her childlike belief in Santa.

Director Susie Moak (with Assistant Director Cindy Starcher and Stage Manager Brian Touchette) has put together a wonderfully zany adaptation of this play. Set Designers Scott F. Mason and Bill Fellner, have again crafted a set that is both appealing and functional. Lighting and sound cues are on the money.

Every Christmas Story Ever Told (And Then Some) is a great family show (probably best suited to kids 10 and up) and destined to become a NBHC—that’s new beloved holiday classic. If you need a little Christmas right this very minute, call the CSP box office and reserve your tickets today. Now if I could just get that Norelco Santa jingle out of my head…

More Info…

Every Christmas Story Ever Told (And Then Some)  at Chapel Street Players
through December 10th
Chapel Street Players, 27 N. Chapel Street, Newark DE 19711
TICKETS: $0-18
(302)3682248;
http://chapelstreetplayers.org/reserveticket/

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(A. Renaldi) Proof Positive http://www.officialanthonyrenaldi.com/?p=458 http://www.officialanthonyrenaldi.com/?p=458#respond Wed, 12 Oct 2016 13:50:06 +0000 http://chapelstreetplayers.org/?p=1864 By Anthony Renaldi

David Auburn’s Proof, winner of both the Tony Award for Best Play as well as the Pulitzer Prize for Drama is showing in a limited run on the Chapel Street Players (CSP) stage in Newark, Delaware. If you have it in your head to skip this play because you’re afraid you won’t understand the mathematical references or never quite understood Pythagorean Theorem,

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By Anthony Renaldi

David Auburn’s Proof, winner of both the Tony Award for Best Play as well as the Pulitzer Prize for Drama is showing in a limited run on the Chapel Street Players (CSP) stage in Newark, Delaware. If you have it in your head to skip this play because you’re afraid you won’t understand the mathematical references or never quite understood Pythagorean Theorem, your calculations are way off. Despite sharing the same name as a mathematical term, the play is only superficially about mathematics and focuses more on relationships and trust. If you can add two plus two, you’ll comprehend what’s happening onstage.

Proof, directed by William Fellner and set entirely on the back porch of a house near the University of Chicago is an intellectual and emotionally intense offering that centers on twenty-five-year-old Catherine (Cyndie Romer), who is emotionally shattered by the sudden death of her father, Robert (Dave Hastings), a brilliant and celebrated mathematician whose early genius revolutionized mathematics, but whose prodigy turned to insanity in the latter part of his life, forcing Catherine to abandon her own education in the field and become her father’s sole caregiver.

Catherine has spent the last several years exhaustively caring for her father and now, with his passing, she is emotionally drained and grief-stricken to the point of dysfunction when her overbearing and resentful older sister, Clair (Leslie Green Shapiro), arrives from New York for the funeral. Clair grudgingly concedes that Catherine has inherited their father’s mathematical genius, but fears that her woefully withdrawn sister has also inherited something else—Robert’s mental degeneration and insanity. Clair is determined to sell the house (the university has been after the block for years) and force Catherine to return to New York with her to seek treatment.

To compound Catherine’s misery, Robert’s former student, Hal (Ahmed Z. Khan), is vainly ransacking Robert’s study, pouring over dozens of notebooks left behind by the brilliant mathematician in the hopes of finding mathematical gold among the insane scribblings and knock-knock jokes in the form of complex math solutions that Robert may have conceived during his periods of lucidity. Hal seeks to preserve Robert’s legacy through the discovery of such a find that would alter the field of mathematics forever. Catherine fears Hal seeks fame for himself.

As Act I proceeds, a romance develops between Catherine and Hal. Catherine, feeling she can trust Hal, gives him a key and points Hal toward a notebook locked away in a drawer of her father’s study, a notebook that contains the proof that Hal has sought all along, a proof that will alter the field of mathematics forever. The act ends with the bombshell revelation that Catherine, not Robert, authored the proof.
Act II opens with a flashback to Robert’s lucid period which tells the backstory of how Catherine announced to her father that she was leaving, going to Northwestern to remove herself from her father’s shadow, an exodus which would allow her to spread her own wings.

We flash forward to where Act I left off, with Catherine’s stunning announcement that she wrote the impossibly complex proof. Clair, always envious of Catherine’s brilliance, is quick to denounce Catherine’s claim of authorship, pointing out that the handwriting is clearly their father’s. It’s unthinkable to Clair that her admittedly brilliant, but emotionally fragile sister could have written the proof. Even Hal doubts that Catherine could have written the proof, agreeing with Clair that the handwriting is remarkably similar to Robert’s. Clair and Hal’s refusal to accept Catherine’s assertion and their subsequent demand of proof, threatens Catherine’s tenuous composure, straining her already shaky relationship with Clair and threatening her budding romance with Hal.

We flash backward once more, becoming witnesses to the moment that prompted Catherine’s return to the house in Chicago and the abandonment of her dreams to act as Robert’s caregiver. With the backstory neatly filled in, we return to the present once more to see the final resolution.

Willian Fellner (with Assistant Director Susan Boudreaux) creates a wonderfully intimate adaptation of the play that is perfectly suited to CSPs cozy theatre space. Serving additional duties as both set and sound designer, Fellner has crafted a natural environment that is appealing and functional. The set design is realistic and sound and lighting cues are on the money. All three combine to create the illusion that we are seeing into the lives of four people play out on a Chicago back porch.

Under Fellner’s guidance, the talented cast conveys warmth, sensitivity, and conviction. Cyndie Romer is convincing as the alternately vivacious or emotionally barren Catherine as she confronts her demons and, with them, her constantly changing emotions.

Dave Hastings, in his Hawaiian shirts, Bermuda shorts, and sandals, portrays Robert as a kindly, loving father with a measured tone and a resonant voice.

The chemistry between Romer and Hastings is evident in the flashback scenes shared by father and daughter. A particularly poignant moment occurs when Robert proudly shows Catherine an outline for his new proof. Catherine scans the page as Robert beams, her smile fades and she falls silent with the realization that her beloved father has once again slipped into madness. “Dad,” she says quietly, “Let’s go inside.” With those four words, Romer communicates her heartbreak and regret.

Hal, the loveable, love-struck nerd is charmingly brought to life by Ahmed Z. Khan and Leslie Green Shapiro delivers a solid performance as the bossy, level-headed, well-meaning Clair.

If my calculations are correct, you will thoroughly enjoy the Chapel Street Players production of Proof. Don’t miss your opportunity to see this wonderfully compassionate and thought-provoking drama.

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